Can we harness a plant's ability to synthesize medicinal compounds? The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd. Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. First and foremost, don't worry, computer engineering and computer science are not focused on calculus or physics, but instead on logic and, in some areas, probability and statistics. Computer Science is a seperate subject, it focuses more on stuff like programming and knowing the basics of what makes up a computer and how it all works. ^^ UCLA has an excellent EE program. If you can, I would strongly recommend taking FM, and if it's not offered at your school I would suggest taking a look at the further mathematics support programme. Some might go as far as saying they are physics classes under ECE headings. However physics is a challenging subject and is respected more than A-level CS, which from what I've heard is not particularly challenging. I've had an interest in technology for quite a while now. I have taken pre-calc. EE requires lots of physics + math + many other stuff too. You can expect to begin your computer science degree by developing a foundation in key computer science topics.Some core computer science courses you may cover include theory of computation, fundamentals of computer science, compliers and operating systems, information theory, basic programming, systems and architecture, software development and testing, … Most CS/CE major require calculus but not as a pre-requisite, so you can just take the class in college. February 2007. Civil engineering appeals to me but I struggle with math. In any case any CS degree requires two semesters of physics so you'll have to do it one way or another. I don't have any experience in this but I'm fairly sure that doing well in your CS A Level (that's a thing now?) College Confidential. Rejected from Cambridge Trinity College (Computer Science with Maths), No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers, Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA), Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO), I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread! I think it is ranked somewhere in the top 20. (Of course, having math and physics helps to get accepted into engineering programs, but is not required.). Any suggestions? You memorize formulas and when/why to use those formulas and then you apply them to problems. im was aiming to go somewhere like Aston. Kai can provide tips and support as you research and apply to colleges, and explore majors and careers. You can expect to begin your computer science degree by developing a foundation in key computer science topics.Some core computer science courses you may cover include theory of computation, fundamentals of computer science, compliers and operating systems, information theory, basic programming, systems and architecture, software development and testing, … Don't drop it, some univiersities do require Physics for Computer Science and it is still an advantage to have it even if a univiersity doesn't require it. You should learn as much math as you can. In my case i had the choice between Computer Engineering (CE), Computer Science (CS) and Computer Science and Engineering (CSE). You should learn as much math as you can. Do physicists really need to master mathematical modeling? so we'll see....any comments about how the program is at UCLA? However physics is a challenging subject and is respected more than A-level CS, which from what I've heard is not particularly challenging. Then actually go and talk to some students, stop by a class if you can. 2) If you are interested in CS, it's best to get programming experience (see code.org), as that is what matters most. As a result, I had to take several physics classes. And yes, CS does exist in AS and A Levels: http://www.cie.org.uk/programmes-and-qualifications/cambridge-international-as-and-a-level-computer-science-9608/. Join Uni of Surrey for a live Q and A on personal statements, 5pm on Thursday! eng. A Levels for a Computer Game developer/designer? If you're good at math, and good at solving problems, I'd take physics. I'm not sure exactly what I want to do but I'm sure it's with computers. The teacher said the science thing is a big plus and it builds lots of skills and its more for fun really as there is no exam just an essay and a powerpoint presentation and a few lessons in the week! A subreddit for those with questions about working in the tech industry or in a computer-science-related job. That may require entangling a grid of 1000 physical qubits to safeguard a single logical qubit, researchers say, a prospect that will take generations of bigger and better quantum computing chips. Does taking it from engineering compared to liberal arts affect your final CV?